« 特別な日のテレビ欄 | トップページ | True security is...68年目の平和の形 »

2013年8月 6日 (火)

2013年、平和のスピーチ

68年目 今日のことば。

平和宣言は2つ前の日記に

Remarks at the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Ceremony by H.E. Mr. Vuk Jeremić, President of the United Nations General Assembly (6 August 2013)
Press Release 13-048-E 06/08/2013

[CHECK AGAINST DELIVERY]

Excellencies,
Distinguished Guests,
Ladies and Gentlemen,

We are gathering today to commemorate the victims of an unparalleled calamity inflicted by the hand of man, and to express our solidarity with its survivors, the hibakusha.

Whomever stands in front of the Atomic Bomb Dome cannot help being overwhelmed by the immensity of the suffering that befell the people of Hiroshima and Nagasaki—hundreds of thousands of men, women and children who bore the onslaught of the most destructive killing device used in the annals of history.

It began with a blinding burst of light, cutting across the sky. Then, as the mushroom cloud grew high overhead, another one—filled with soot and debris—enveloped the city. Next came the fires, spreading quickly, and producing shots of scalding air and showers of burning cinders.

Human beings knew of no defense against such a force.

The hibakusha’s whole lives; what they knew; whom they loved—all of it was gone.

Yet they refused to succumb to abandon, carrying on in the belief that life ultimately prevails, even in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, where the deadliest of horrors came to pass.


Ladies and Gentlemen,

The resilience and dignity of the hibakusha has served as a source of great inspiration in humanity’s ongoing effort to rid the world of nuclear weapons.

From its founding, the United Nations has stood at the forefront of this endeavor.

The very first resolution adopted by the General Assembly called for the elimination of atomic arms and “all other major weapons adaptable to mass destruction.”

In the years that have followed, the nuclear issue has remained high on the agenda, resulting in some notable achievements, such as the Test Ban Treaty. In past decades, we have also made progress both in reducing the overall number, and preventing the proliferation, of nuclear arms.

Nonetheless, we continue to live under the threatening shadow of annihilation.

I believe we must keep the world’s attention focused on this grave threat to peace.

I am privileged to be in charge of organizing the first-ever High-level meeting of the General Assembly on nuclear disarmament. In accordance with resolution 67/39, it will take place this September.

I hope this will be a significant step forward in fulfilling our goal to excise atomic weapons, so that the sufferings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki of sixty-eight years ago may never repeat.


Ladies and Gentlemen,

Near my office at United Nations Headquarters in New York lies a rose garden, at the entry of which stands the Japanese Peace Bell. It was cast not far away from here, with coins from sixty different countries—including my own.

The Bell is encased in a structure designed to resemble a traditional Shinto shrine. On its surface is etched a single, solemn inscription: “Long live absolute world peace.”

Every year in September, it is rung as a symbolic reminder of this great human aspiration.

That sort of peace is more than the mere absence of hostilities. It is about preventing the conditions for war from being met ever again.

It is about having the strength to overcome long-held grievances, the will to forsake vengeance, and the resolve to achieve reconciliation.

This is the cause which the hibakusha have so nobly advanced during all these years, bestowing through their endeavors a higher meaning to the deaths of their beloved.

It is also a cause I believe each of us who visit this hallowed ground should take up with a renewed sense of purpose, aware that this great task will likely remain unfinished for many years hence; yet hopeful that the generations to come will nonetheless embrace everything it stands for, and so bring us ever-closer to the day when absolute peace shall reign unopposed across our planet.

Thank you for your attention.

MESSAGE TO PEACE MEMORIAL CEREMONY, Hiroshima, 6 August 2013
Press Release 13-047-E 06/08/2013

Delivered by Dr. Noeleen Heyzer, Executive Secretary of the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific

I am honoured to pay my respects on this solemn occasion.

Tens of thousands have gathered here in Hiroshima, and millions more are observing this occasion around the world, as together we remember those who lost their lives here 68 years ago.

We pay tribute to the memory of the hundreds of thousands who perished or were gravely wounded. At the same time, we applaud those who survived to becomehibakusha. We thank them for all they have done to educate the public, especially young people, about the horrors of nuclear war and the importance of nuclear disarmament. They have helped to transform this city from a scene of devastation into a symbol of peace.

We also join hands with the new generation of citizens of Hiroshima who are working to build an era of greater peace, security and justice for all.

We are united in countering the erroneous view that security is achieved through the pursuit of military dominance and threats of mutual annihilation. Our memories are long. We know this path is a dead end.

True security is based on people’s welfare – on a thriving economy, on strong public health and education programmes, and on fundamental respect for our common humanity. Development, peace, disarmament, reconciliation and justice are not separate from security; they help to underpin it.

At this Hiroshima Peace Memorial Ceremony, I appeal for universal adherence to the United Nations Charter, which emphasizes peace, disarmament, a prohibition on threats or use of force, and social and economic development.

Together, let us reaffirm our commitment to create a world free of nuclear weapons. This is the most meaningful way we can pay our respects to those we honour today and pave the way for a better future for all.

* *** *
---

今でも、逃げていくときに見た光景をはっきり覚えている。
当時3歳だった祖母の言葉に驚き、怖くなりました。
「行ってきます」と出かけた家族、「ただいま」と当たり前に帰ってくることを信じていた。でも帰ってこなかった。
それを聞いたとき、涙が出て、震えが止まりませんでした。

68年前の今日、わたしたちのまち広島は、原子爆弾によって破壊されました。
体に傷を負うだけでなく、心までも深く傷つけ、
消えることなく、多くの人々を苦しめています。

今、わたしたちはその広島に生きています。
原爆を生き抜き、命のバトンをつないで。
命とともに、つなぎたいものがあります。
だから、あの日から目をそむけません。
もっと、知りたいのです。
被爆の事実を、被爆者の思いを。
もっと、伝えたいのです。
世界の人々に、未来に。

平和とは、安心して生活できること。
平和とは、一人一人が輝いていること。
平和とは、みんなが幸せを感じること。

平和は、わたしたち自らがつくりだすものです。
そのために、
友達や家族など、身近にいる人に感謝の気持ちを伝えます。
多くの人と話し合う中で、いろいろな考えがあることを学びます。
スポーツや音楽など、自分の得意なことを通して世界の人々と交流します。

方法は違っていてもいいのです。
大切なのは、わたしたち一人一人の行動なのです。
さあ、一緒に平和をつくりましょう。
大切なバトンをつなぐために。

平成25年(2013年)8月6日
              こども代表 広島市立吉島東小学校 6年 竹内 駿治
                    広島市立口田小学校  6年 中森 柚子

-----

http://mainichi.jp/select/news/20130806k0000e010205000c.htmlより、
原爆の日:安倍晋三首相あいさつ(全文)
毎日新聞 2013年(最終更新 08月06日 13時52分)

 広島市原爆死没者慰霊式、平和祈念式に臨み、原子爆弾の犠牲となった方々のみたまに対し、謹んで、哀悼の誠をささげます。今なお被爆の後遺症に苦しんでおられる皆様に、心から、お見舞いを申し上げます。
 68年前の朝、一発の爆弾が、十数万になんなんとする、貴い命を奪いました。7万戸の建物を壊し、一面を、業火と爆風にさらわせ、廃虚と化しました。生きながらえた人々に、病と障害の、また生活上の、言い知れぬ苦難を強いました。
 犠牲と言うべくして、あまりにおびただしい犠牲でありました。しかし、戦後の日本を築いた先人たちは、広島にたおれた人々を忘れてはならじと、心に深く刻めばこそ、我々に、平和と、繁栄の、祖国を作り、与えてくれたのです。セミしぐれが今もしじまを破る、緑豊かな広島の街路に、私たちは、その最も美しい達成を見いださずにはいられません。
 私たち日本人は、唯一の、戦争被爆国民であります。そのような者として、我々には、確実に、核兵器のない世界を実現していく責務があります。その非道を、後の世に、また世界に、伝え続ける務めがあります。
 昨年、我が国が国連総会に提出した核軍縮決議は、米国並びに英国を含む、史上最多の99カ国を共同提案国として巻き込み、圧倒的な賛成多数で採択されました。
 本年、若い世代の方々を、核廃絶の特使とする制度を始めました。来年は、我が国が一貫して主導する非核兵器国の集まり、「軍縮・不拡散イニシアチブ」の外相会合を、ここ広島で開きます。
 今なお苦痛を忍びつつ、原爆症の認定を待つ方々に、一日でも早くその認定が下りるよう、最善を尽くします。被爆された方々の声に耳を傾け、より良い援護策を進めていくため、有識者や被爆された方々の代表を含む関係者の方々に、議論を急いで頂いています。
 広島のみたまを悼む朝、私は、これら責務に、倍旧の努力を傾けていくことをお誓いします。
 結びに、いま一度、犠牲になった方々のご冥福を、心よりお祈りします。ご遺族と、ご存命の被爆者の皆様には、幸多からんことを祈念します。核兵器の惨禍が再現されることのないよう、非核三原則を堅持しつつ、核兵器廃絶に、また、恒久平和の実現に、力を惜しまぬことをお誓いし、私のごあいさつとします。
平成25年8月6日
内閣総理大臣・安倍晋三

|

« 特別な日のテレビ欄 | トップページ | True security is...68年目の平和の形 »

平和」カテゴリの記事

コメント

コメントを書く



(ウェブ上には掲載しません)




トラックバック

この記事のトラックバックURL:
http://app.f.cocolog-nifty.com/t/trackback/1210811/52771687

この記事へのトラックバック一覧です: 2013年、平和のスピーチ:

« 特別な日のテレビ欄 | トップページ | True security is...68年目の平和の形 »